Island Readers & Writers Blog

Annette LeBlanc Cate on Vinalhaven and North Haven

Previously: Annette Cate on Islesboro

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Day 2 on Vinalhaven

Thank goodness our outer island site coordinator, Jan Keiper, joined us on day two of our visits with Annette LeBlanc Cate, as we had a delayed start to our morning. She was waiting at the ferry from Lincolnville to Vinalhaven with tickets in hand as we ran with our bags and sketchbooks banging, to hop on just in the nick of time. Island living has its challenges and everybody knows that the ferry waits for no one.

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Walking into the beautiful granite foyer of the Vinalhaven School, we immediately noticed the papier-mache bird sculptures displayed for all to see. In the library, there were incredible multi-layered seagull paintings. Annette was impressed with the various viewpoints the kids chose to paint.

This visit was a special collaboration between the North Haven Community School and Vinalhaven School, along with area conservationist groups. As one teacher picked us up from the ferry, another was picking up the North Haven kids from grades 2-4 at the thoroughfare.

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Joining us for an all-group presentation that morning was Kirk Gentalen of Maine Coast Heritage Trust and Sherry Rega of Vinalhaven Land Trust. IRW was thrilled to partner with both community organizations after a great deal of advanced planning that had taken place earlier this spring. Their combined expertise was put to good use out on the trails. Before heading out, each shared a bit about their organizations, the work they do to preserve habitats on the island and why it’s important. Annette had created a “why watch birds poster” to get kids thinking.

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Annette noted that kids are great observers. “You can sharpen your observation and drawing skills,” she said. “Your sketchbook can be like a diary of your day.” She encouraged them to just “catch shapes” and “make short notes” and not to get caught up in perfection.

Kirk, a natural on the stage, performed a dramatic representation of the woodcock “beeping” which elicited great laughter from the crowd. He asked the kids, “Why do birds sing?” “To attract a mate,” was the clear response. Next up, Sherry shared some good trail information and handed out maps and brochures for all. “How should you be on a bird walk?” Kirk asked, helping kids to think before we headed out.

As is always the case with a school visit, flexibility and adaptability are the name of the game so when the bus meant to transport us didn’t start, we had no problem shifting gears and walking to the trailhead. It was delightful to see 36 kids and accompanying adults walking down the streets of the island. Immediately, Annette, ever with a sharp eye, pointed out a cardinal. But it wasn’t long before kids began pointing out gulls, eiders, goldfinches, and even a great blue heron. The prized sighting was an American kestrel, a small and gorgeous falcon.

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Along the trail Mr. Warren, fourth grade teacher at Vinalhaven, shared with Annette that his kids loved her book, “Look Up! Bird-watching in Your Own Back-yard.” He said they were so enthralled by it that he’d have to stop them from reading to move on to other work! Annette loved hearing that!

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When walking with children you just never know what they might say. Looking down at his now-dirty shoes one youngster said, “My sneakers match my tuxedo now. It got dirty on Easter.” A young girl walking behind us was heard singing, “Tuesday is a fun day. Funday Tuesday!” Does it get better than that?

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After the installation of a new battery, the repaired bus picked us up to head back to the school to the great relief of many tired students. One little guy said if the bus wasn’t there he was going to call his mom to come get him! After lunch, we were back in the library where the kids used Annette’s field guides as references to double-check the details of what they wanted to paint. As the Vinalhaven and North Haven students chatted as they created, one boy from Vinalhaven asked a girl, “You live on North Haven?” She shyly replied, “Yes.”  Then a girl said to her, “I love your earrings!” And another said, “Are you going to visit again?” Bringing the two island schools together in collaboration was one of IRW’s goals for this visit.

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Fantastic artwork was created and then those who wanted to share did so. One of the last to share had painted a chickadee and using his humor he let us know it was “Chick ID,” to which Annette chimed in, “Hey, chick do you have an ID?” It was great fun all around.

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The highlight of the day was the newly-hatched baby duck brought in by Vinalhaven third grade teacher Ms. Reidy. She let every child have a turn holding the adorable, fuzzy duckling. Total cuteness overload!

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Day 3 on North Haven

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It took two trips for Brown’s taxi to get IRW and Vinalhaven kids from grades 5-7 across the thoroughfare as we headed off to North Haven for the day. The rain held off for us once again and we were able to enjoy another great day of hiking. First, the North Haven team had organized some “get to know you” games.

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This time, we had 41 kids altogether and Maria, the Island Institute Island Fellow, facilitated the games. With everyone in a circle, it was a bit like musical chairs except there were mini bean bags instead of chairs.

Once settled on the gym bleachers for an overview of the day, North Haven grades 5-6 teacher Mr. Dow asked the kids, “Why did we do the games?” “To get comfortable.” “To mix us up.” “To get to know each other.” During Annette’s overview, she wanted kids to recognize that birds who migrate always return.

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Also joining us on our hike was Kate Quinn, North Haven school librarian and avid birder. After dividing into three groups, we boarded the bus (no hiccups this day!) and were dropped off at three different locations. One group spotted a phoebe right away and it seemed to follow us along for a bit. Maria had the kids try the technique of “phishing” where you say “psh, psh, psh” to see if you can attract any birds. She also had the kids practice focusing by shaping their hands into circles and drawing them up to their eyes to focus on a specific spot. She also sent us through the woods in turn on a “solo walk.” She would release one person every 20 seconds and we had to walk silently along the path, through the woods and out onto the golf course where we met the other two groups. One boy shared with IRW Site Coordinator Jan Keiper, “I want to be one of those people who studies birds.” “An ornithologist?” she asked. He had his grandma’s binoculars that were a bit big for his little hands.

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While the whole group enjoyed a snack we spotted not one, but two kestrels near the green. Time flies when you’re having fun and there are buses to catch, so we had to regroup and head back to the school.

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A special lunch prepared by volunteers was awaiting us; corn chowder, chicken soup and other delights. After cleanup and another team building game, the kids settled in to create art using their notes and Annette’s field guides. Some amazing art was created even by the most hesitant kids. It can be intimidating to create in front of new people and these kids did amazing work.

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IRW was thrilled to act as catalyst to bring these two communities together. The middle school students talked to their island peers about when they might get together again. It was nice to see them personally connecting with each other. A dance was announced so perhaps they will get to see each other soon! The feedback of the day was overwhelmingly positive and we look forward to future collaborations with all involved.

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We’d like to give a special shout out to the following organizations who collaborated with IRW and our partner schools:

Maine Coast Heritage Trust

The Vinalhaven Land Trust

Island Fellows/The Island Institute

Thanks also to North Haven Central School for sharing additional photos with us.

See more photos in our Facebook album! 

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Whiting students share lighthouse projects

Students from Whiting Village School shared research projects and stories inspired by Sophie Blackall’s “Hello Lighthouse” program at their recent curriculum fair.

Experts on the Fresnel lens, historic Maine heroine Abbie Burgess and other topics presented their findings to their families, community and peers — and even came dressed in period-appropriate costumes found by Mrs. Higgins at Goodwill! (Three other students had also worked on projects, but were unable to present that night.)

Prior to Sophie’s visit to their school last month, these kids worked hard researching and creating impressive work in preparation for the author visit. They proudly shared their projects with Sophie, who was overjoyed by their work and took time to compliment each student. As you can see, the learning incited by these programs and great stories creates ripples that extend far beyond the day of the author visit.

Mrs. Higgins said:

The kids built lighthouses out of cups with tea lights at the top, Principal Scott Johnson’s clever design! They are pictured in front of Sophie’s mural project…They wanted to dress up, so I had fun at the Goodwill finding costumes for them. Pictured from the top: Phoebe read her report on Abbie Burgess; Cort read his on the Fresnel lens; Terra, life in a lighthouse in 1951 (she had never buttoned a blouse!); and Ryan, the duties of a lighthouse keeper…Thanks for Sophie, a great educator/writer/artist and her finely crafted book. The kids had a great time.

Thanks to Stephanie Higgins for the photos and information!

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Anica Mrose Rissi visits Jonesport and Deer Isle-Stonington

IRW spent four, fun-filled days days with children’s book author Anica Mrose Rissi, a native of Deer Isle. We first met Anica last summer at an event at the Chase Emerson Memorial Library in Deer Isle and were thrilled when she agreed to work with us! She visited Jonesport, Deer Isle, Steuben and Milbridge with a program around her picture book “The Teacher’s Pet” and “Anna, Banana” chapter book series.

Jonesport Elementary School

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Anica kicked off her school visits with us at Jonesport Elementary School, where pre-K teacher Jeanna Carver had just been announced as the Washington County Teacher of the Year! Her classroom was filled with science projects inspired by “The Teacher’s Pet,” in which a tadpole turns into a hippo, an unlikely occurrence. But the kids took the opportunity to study life cycles and were busy hatching salamanders, salmon and even ducks!Image may contain: 1 person

Anica led story time with pre-K and kindergartners with “The Teacher’s Pet,” which the kids had read in class and loved. She also had time to read her newest book, “Watch Out for Wolf,” a spin on the classic tale of the Three Little Pigs. She uses Visual Thinking Strategies during her story time, a similar method to the Whole Book Approach, so that kids can pause to take in the art and what it might be telling us about the story. After story time, Anica took in the life cycle posters the pre-K kids had created out of recycled objects and other media. There were some very creative life cycles!

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Grades 1-4 participated in small group workshops with Anica in the cozy library. Anica shared the book she wrote and illustrated at the age of four as a child growing up in Deer Isle called “Anica’s Book of Poisonous Things.” It contains great advice such as, “This is dirt. Do not eat it!” She said she was always creating stories and had a great interest in both animals and birthday parties. Those interests led her to her first book, “The Teacher’s Pet,” and then her popular “Anna, Banana” chapter book series, the first of which is about a birthday party gone wrong.

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After her presentation, the older grades, who had read “Anna, Banana and the Friendship Split,” came up with stories out loud. Anica gave them a prompt and then continued to ask questions about what a character did, where they were and why they did what they did. It is a great exercise to get kids thinking about how stories flow and what questions a story needs to answer.  There were some very silly and creative stories from Jonesport kids and fun was had by all.

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Deer-Isle Stonington Elementary School

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Although the school has moved to a new building since Anica was a student there, it was still a wonderful homecoming as Anica knew many of the teachers with whom she attended school and are now educators there!

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She was able to connect with the kids by sharing how she got her start writing right there in Deer Isle and that many of the kids likely pass her childhood home on their way into school each day. It was wonderful to have Anica model for these kids that writers come from everywhere, including small islands off the coast of Maine.

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First up was a visit to the first grade classroom, where the kids enjoyed a read aloud from “Watch Out for Wolf.” As Anica signed copies of “The Teacher’s Pet” to each child, the kids illustrated a story they had come up with aloud together about a lost kitten.

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In the grades 3-4 workshops, Anica read from a book in her “Anna, Banana,” series as the kids had read the first in the series, “Anna, Banana and the Friendship Split” in class. Anica handed out three book titles and the kids took turns creating stories that would go with the titles.

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Kindergartners enjoyed a story time and then as Anica signed books, the kids split into two groups to illustrate animals they might see in a zoo. So many bright colors and shapes were used to create fun scenes!

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In the last workshop of the day, second graders came up with a crazy story — another one involving a kitten — and then illustrated a scene from the book. Anica then left for the day, but said she hopes to see some of these new faces around Deer Isle, where she will be for the summer!

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Up next, Anica’s visits to Ella Lewis School and Milbridge Elementary School.

 

 

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Look Up with Annette LeBlanc Cate on Islesboro

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After a week-long “Hello Lighthouse” tour with Sophie Blackall, it was off to the islands for birdwatching with author/illustrator, Annette LeBlanc Cate. IRW Director of School Programs Alison Johnson met up with Annette in Lincolnville to catch the ferry out to Islesboro for day one of a three-day island tour.

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“Look Up! Birdwatching in Your Own Backyard,” Annette’s book designed to show kids that birdwatching is a fun activity for all, was used as the platform to get kids in grades K-7 outside and making observations. Prior to heading out, Annette shared how she came to write the book, noting that spending your days working in a dark office will make anyone crave the outdoors eventually. It was during her work breaks that she walked in a cemetery nearby and began to notice and wonder about the birds she was seeing. Looking through guide books, which are dense in information and can be difficult to navigate, the idea to write a kid-friendly book formed. “How long did it take to write?” she was asked, “Only about seven years.” That’s a long time.

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Through the doors of the old stone “cottage” that now houses the Islesboro Central School, we headed out on the trails. Everyone was thrilled to see the sun poke its head through the very persistent cloud cover that had greyed the skies for days. It is a definite challenge to keep 10 middle schoolers quiet in the woods, but immediately we heard a Phoebe singing its repetitive song. Seeing it was a whole different thing. An eagle soared over us, a robin flitted about in the field, there were signs of woodpeckers, and we heard an American Redstart, and a chickadee. One student, upon seeing a blue jay claimed one had brought him a rock once.

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The kids were quick to share with Annette what they knew about birds. “I saw two pileated woodpeckers on the same branch once!” shared one young man. When crows were the topic, the teacher shared that they had been discussing them as they were reading “Animal Farm.” As we walked and paused along the trail and in the lovely school orchard, the kids took notes and sketched what they saw. Later, back in the classroom, we broke out the art supplies and they got busy transferring their work from sketches to drawings using watercolor pencils to add color.

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When we visited the K-3 classroom, Chloe Joule, an education specialist from the Islesboro Land Trust, joined in. She had been working with the kids to help them learn about the local habitat and bird migration patterns. We weren’t able to get these kids outside due to time constraints, but they fully engaged in a guess-what-I’m-drawing game with Annette as she drew the birds we had seen with the older kids. The kids had obviously been out on the trails before as one youngster shared, “We got to chase the turkeys!”

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Moving on to the 4-5th grade classroom, we took the democratic approach and kids voted on whether they wanted to go outside or do some painting inside. Watercolors won the day and they created some amazing artwork. They were eager to share birds they had seen recently and one student noted that his mom had just been taking pictures of a great blue heron. Another shared, “I see ospreys all the time. They swoop down and catch fish.” When Annette shared that she drew the birds she saw while driving up from Massachusetts, a concerned child asked, “Were you drawing and driving?” Annette assured him she was safely settled before she began drawing. Too cute!

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“Hello Lighthouse” with Sophie Blackall at Swan’s Island and Tremont

Author/illustrator Sophie Blackall ended her “Hello Lighthouse” tour with visits at Swan’s Island Elementary School and Tremont Consolidated School. (Read about her school visits to Beals, Lubec and Whiting!)

Swan’s Island Elementary School

After a week of blustery and cool days, the sun finally made an appearance as we boarded the ferry in Bass Harbor headed for a fun-filled day with Swan’s Island Elementary School.

First up was the K-2 class, with a few visitors from the local preschool. After a read aloud from “Hello Lighthouse,” the kids got to drawing their own aliens. Many were proud of their art and gifted them to Sophie! She definitely had a heavier suitcase on the way back home, thanks to all the art and thank-you notes she received.

Grades 6-8 created a “Missed Connections” mural. There were some really talented artists in this group, who created cat faces, crazy clothing and other oddly proportioned body parts. The mural was hung in the classroom for all to appreciate.

In the grades 3-5 workshop, the kids created watercolor lighthouses. The day before Sophie’s visit, the fishermen father of a student helped the class create their own buoys that they planned to decorate with their own special lighthouses and display at the school’s art show.

After the workshops, the entire school hopped on a bus and headed to Burnt Coat Harbor Lighthouse, where everyone had the chance to explore the winding staircase, take in the panoramic view from the light room and visit the old keeper’s house. It was a perfect way to cap off the “Hello Lighthouse” program.

Tremont Consolidated School 

Tremont provided the perfect ending to our whirlwind tour. As students, teachers, and IRW board members filed into the gym for the all-school presentation, we were treated to sea shanties sung by the middle schoolers. “Can you believe they made me go to all those other schools first?” Sophie asked the students. (Every school was Sophie’s favorite!) When she asked who’d read all of the “Ivy and Bean” books (which Sophie illustrates) many hands shot in the air.

After Sophie’s presentation, Principal Jandrea True presented her with flowers and a gift from the school. Sophie was touched by the sweet gesture.

Prior to Sophie’s visit, grades pre-K to 2 teamed up in groups with one student from each grade to make lighthouses out of milk and orange juice cartons. They were little towers with both interior and exterior details.

After the art workshop in which Sophie had them create aliens, librarian Joyce Mahoney was very excited to see the kids reading their books immediately after receiving them. One second grader asked“How long have you been in your writing and illustrating career?”

During the grades 3-4 workshop, the students drew their own rooms that they would like to see to place inside a giant lighthouse. They had so many creative ideas — one was even equipped with a disco ball and a slide!

It was a wonderful day to end with Sophie, who inspired hundreds of kids and teachers in just five days. As one fourth grader from Tremont said, “I just want to say that I really get inspired by your art. It actually inspired me to animate.”

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“Hello Lighthouse” at Lubec and Whiting

Days 2-3 of author/illustrator Sophie Blackall’s five-day “Hello Lighthouse” tour took place at Lubec Consolidated School and Whiting Village School in Washington County.

Lubec Consolidated School

 

The gloomy day outside could do nothing to dampen the spirits inside Lubec Consolidated School where lighthouse poetry, paintings and clay models lit Sophie’s way to the room where pre-K and kindergarten students were waiting for her to read her book, “Hello Lighthouse.” Their questions, “Did you do that with a pencil?” and “How did you paint the fog?” revealed the intensity of their interest in the book. Sophie introduced the squiggly game and had kids draw a free-shaped line and then use their imaginations to see the possibilities of what it could be.

 

Sophie told them that sometimes you have to be upside down for this and as you can see, they had no problem complying. Sophie finished the picture with their suggestions and one girl asked, “How do we get our parents to do this at home?”

Grades 1-4 met in the art room with plenty of space for drawing. Sophie had them draw lighthouses with speech bubbles of what they might say, cutting them out and gluing them onto a mural together. They had a lot of fun taking selfies with Sophie and learning facts about Australia where she is from.

 

 

The upper grades were treated to a slideshow of Sophie’s travels with Save The Children, pictures of her studio in New York City and learned of the 45 books she has illustrated. Modeling on the idea of Sophie’s artwork in her adult book, “Missed Connections,” students created their own mixed people poster with fantastic results.

 

Students then had a blast drawing feet, legs, bodies and heads that were mixed in a pile and then glued onto a mural randomly to great effect. All the murals were hung in the hallways for continued giggling and fond memories of the day’s visit.

 

Whiting Village School

Sophie’s last stop in Washington County was in Whiting, before heading to Mount Desert Island for the night.

At Whiting Village School, Sophie shared some of the 45 books she has illustrated. “Big Red Lollipop” was one that had kids shouting, “We’ve read that one!” Their teacher believed that pretty much every student in the school had read it. This warmed Sophie’s heart!

 

It’s a pretty amazing experience to have an author/illustrator read their own book to you in person. She read aloud “Hello Lighthouse” to the youngest kids, her endearing Australian accent, her voice soft and lilting. On the last page she’d pause and ask the kids what they noticed in the illustration. “The girl has grown up!” “I see the lighthouse.” “I see all the pictures they had up in the lighthouse!” “I see the whale!”

Grades 1-4 had chosen lighthouses to research and created stories and pictures inspired by their findings. During their art workshop, they drew lighthouses and aliens to attach to a class mural. We loved their creativity!

 

 

In the grades 5-8 workshop, the older students worked on a mural inspired by “Missed Connections.” There were giant heads, tiny arms and crazy clothing. A fun day was had by all!

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“Hello Lighthouse” tour kicks off at Beals Elementary School

Caldecott-winning author/illustrator Sophie Blackall arrived in Maine from New York City on Easter Sunday ahead of her five-day “Hello Lighthouse” tour of Washington County, Mount Desert Island and Swan’s Island.

Sophie arrived to a chilly fog, but enjoyed Easter lunch in Bar Harbor with IRW Executive Director Jan Coates and Program Assistant Lisa Herrington. Sophie even brought us bagels from New York! She got a tour of Sand Beach and the Park Loop Road before settling in at her hotel in Prospect Harbor for a night of rest before the long week ahead.

Departing for Beals Island from Prospect Harbor early in the misty Monday morning, Sophie stopped to get a picture of the old cannery sign depicting the yellow slicker-wearing fisherman, a classic reminder of the important role mariners have played in Downeast Maine and their important connection to lighthouses.

 

The enthusiasm among teachers at Beals Elementary School at an early March meeting was a sure sign of a terrific first day of Sophie’s visits. Weeks before our arrival, the research and creative processes among all students were underway. Two weeks later, the middle school students had chosen a lighthouse to research and presented their projects to the local historical society. Beautiful paintings were also created on canvases donated by the local library. We love when community comes together to support the students.

After all of this preparation and hard work, Sophie finally arrived to Beals! A lighthouse made with Campbell’s soup cans greeted Sophie in the front hallway. The students had held a canned food drive to create the lighthouse. The soup cans will be donated to the local food pantry. What creative and thoughtful school community!

Before the all-school presentation, middle schoolers performed a sea shanty song inspired by “Hello Lighthouse,” complete with the sounds of bell buoys and drums signifying an impending storm. The song went beyond all expectations and filled Sophie’s eyes with tears.

Sophie then shared how she came to fall in love with lighthouses and her process for creating the book. It took her three years to complete “Hello Lighthouse,” which she wrote the first draft in a lighthouse in Newfoundland. Sophie then asked the school to help her illustrate the alien character for her upcoming book, “If You Come to Earth.” Kids shouted out suggestions to create a crazy-looking alien, which could appear in her next book!
During the pre-k/kindergarten workshop, Sophie drew a kangaroo, an animal native to her homeland of Australia. She showed the class where the country is on a map, and was impressed by the kids’ knowledge of kangaroos! She then read aloud from the first book she both wrote and illustrated, “Are You Awake?” The class shared the lighthouse replica they had made out of clay. As Sophie signed a copy of “Hello Lighthouse” for one little girl, she said “I wish I could do what you do!” To which Sophie replied, “I bet you can!”
Grades 1-2 created a mural of Beals Island. Each artist drew something they might find on their island and then cut it out and placed it on a large mural. Some drew sea life, while others drew their school or home. All work was creative and beautiful!
The grades 3-4 workshop worked on a similar project. Two students even worked together to create the bridge from Jonesport to Beals Island. They shared with Sophie miniature lighthouses they had made out of clay and researched.
Grades 5-8 worked on watercolor paintings using frisket paper, a clear, stick-on film that artists use when they want to create white space. Each artists cut out a shape in the frisket paper and stuck it to their watercolor paper before painting. They then ripped it off to reveal their shape.
Thank you, Beals, for a wonderful welcome for Sophie and IRW. Next up: Sophie’s visits to Lubec Consolidated School and Whiting Village School.

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Middle-Grade Read with John David Anderson

Author John David Anderson, or Dave as he prefers to be called, delighted nearly 60 middle schoolers from Edmunds Consolidated School, Charlotte Elementary School and Pembroke Elementary School during our Washington County Middle-Grade Read around his novel, “Posted.” It was a great way to kick of IRW’s spring school visits!

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Kids from all three schools piled into the gym at Edmunds for Dave’s lively — and giggle-inducing — presentation. Everyone was drawn to Dave who is a self-described “11-year-old at heart” as he shared how he got into writing and what inspires him (“Star Wars”!) He explained why writing is the best job in the world (because he doesn’t have to leave his house or change out of his pajamas) and the four secrets of storytelling: seek inspiration, flex your imagination, use your toolbox (elements such as alliteration and simile) and, most importantly, never give up! Dave also urged kids to remember that “words are the most powerful tool you have” and to be kind and use your words wisely, a theme that runs through “Posted.”

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The kids were broken up into three groups with peers from different schools and moved through three workshops throughout the day: a writing workshop, art workshop and trivia game.

In Dave’s writing workshop, they created silly limericks that had to follow the correct meter and rhyme scheme (lines 1,2 and 5 must rhyme; while lines 3 and 4 also rhyme; lines 1,2 and 5 must have 7-10 syllables and lines 3 and 4 must have 5-7 syllables — whew!). There was a lot of laughter and very creative poems shared aloud.

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In the art workshop, kids had four minutes to illustrate four different scenes from “Posted” in graphic novel format. We loved seeing all of the different interpretations of what those scenes looked like.

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Throughout the Edmunds hallways, there were Post-its that featured inspiring aphorisms, just like in “Posted.”

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During the trivia game, the group had to work as a team in order to answer questions about books found in the Edmunds library. Once they found the book, there was an envelope inside with a question relating to “Posted.” The team had to answer that question, then receive yet another envelope that would be opened at the end of the day to unscramble an aphorism from the book. There was much laughter and teamwork as the kids worked together to find library books and remember some very specific details about “Posted.”

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At the end of the day, all three teams came together to try and quickly unscramble their phrase. Each team managed to figure out the phrases!

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This fun-filled day was the perfect complement to Dave’s exuberant personality and IRW was so fortunate to bring this author to Maine schools for the first time this spring.

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Middle-Grade Read with John David Anderson

Author John David Anderson, or Dave as he prefers to be called, delighted nearly 60 middle schoolers from Edmunds Consolidated School, Charlotte Elementary School and Pembroke Elementary School during our Washington County Middle-Grade Read around his novel, “Posted.” It was a great way to kick of IRW’s spring school visits!

Kids from all three schools piled into the gym at Edmunds for Dave’s lively — and giggle-inducing — presentation. Everyone was drawn to Dave who is a self-described “11-year-old at heart” as he shared how he got into writing and what inspires him (“Star Wars”!) He explained why writing is the best job in the world (because he doesn’t have to leave his house or change out of his pajamas) and the four secrets of storytelling: seek inspiration, flex your imagination, use your toolbox (elements such as alliteration and simile) and, most importantly, never give up! Dave also urged kids to remember that “words are the most powerful tool you have” and to be kind and use your words wisely, a theme that runs through “Posted.”

The kids were broken up into three groups with peers from different schools and moved through three workshops throughout the day: a writing workshop, art workshop and trivia game.

In Dave’s writing workshop, they created silly limericks that had to follow the correct meter and rhyme scheme (lines 1,2 and 5 must rhyme; while lines 3 and 4 also rhyme; lines 1,2 and 5 must have 7-10 syllables and lines 3 and 4 must have 5-7 syllables — whew!). There was a lot of laughter and very creative poems shared aloud.

In the art workshop, kids had four minutes to illustrate four different scenes from “Posted” in graphic novel format. We loved seeing all of the different interpretations of what those scenes looked like.

Throughout the Edmunds hallways, there were Post-its that featured inspiring aphorisms, just like in “Posted.”

During the trivia game, the group had to work as a team in order to answer questions about books found in the Edmunds library. Once they found the book, there was an envelope inside with a question relating to “Posted.” The team had to answer that question, then receive yet another envelope that would be opened at the end of the day to unscramble an aphorism from the book. There was much laughter and teamwork as the kids worked together to find library books and remember some very specific details about “Posted.”

At the end of the day, all three teams came together to try and quickly unscramble their phrase. Each team managed to figure out the phrases!

This fun-filled day was the perfect complement to Dave’s exuberant personality and IRW was so fortunate to bring this author to Maine schools for the first time this spring.

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Beals students show off artwork, lighthouse projects

In preparation of two-time Caldecott winner Sophie Blackall’s visit to Beals Elementary School on April 22, the school hosted the Beals Historical Society in their gym for a presentation of lighthouse projects from fifth-eighth grade students. These students researched lighthouses from Boston Harbor Lighthouse to West Quoddy head, wrote papers and created posters with findings from their research. If that wasn’t enough, they had also painted pictures of their beacons in art class all in preparation of Sophie’s “Hello Lighthouse” tour. One student even created a beautiful 3-D model of a lighthouse!

The gallery walk format led to fine discussions with the students where we learned about lighthouse ghosts and the reason for the tower and Fresnel lens changes at Portland Head Light. Many students are related to lighthouse keepers and have a personal interest. Principal Chris Crowley is also tied to keepers and had family artifacts on display including a light keeper’s logbook. Also on display were all of the books IRW has brought the school through its author/ illustrator visits! The evening ended with ice cream sandwiches for all and a viewing of the video “Light Spirit.” We can’t wait for April 22 to see what the rest of the Beals kids have in store for IRW and Sophie.

 

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